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(4/5/23)NOTICE: 
Coming Back Home Rescue has decided to start off the second year of saving lives, we will be slowly moving away from OWNER SURRENDERS. 

We understand that this can feel frustrating for our community who may feel like they have one less safe place of taking their animals, however, we feel this is best in order to help us focus on our mission: Pulling animals pending euthanization to give them a second chance at life, and to bring them back home. 

Our doors will still be open (when available) to the elderly going into new circumstances, military who are about to deploy, or those who may be escaping domestic violent situations as we feel these are important members of our community who need that extra help.  

We thank you for your patience and understanding. 

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ABOUT

Coming Back Home Rescue is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that started in June, 2022. We are completely foster based and rely heavily on our volunteers, and our community to help continuing our mission. Our mission at Coming Back Home Rescue is to reduce the number of animals being euthanized each year. It's such a common occurrence and there's a great number of animals who are capable of living healthy, wonderful lives. However, we understand the situation our fellow rescue/shelter friends are in and do what we can to help without shaming anyone. Our job is to understand these animals, rescue them from these situations and help them heal into loving homes. 

We don't stop there, though. Even if we pull out-of-state, we are highly dedicated to our local community. We provide educational materials to help them succeed with their pets, provide training consultations for problematic behavior, TNR feral felines, provide discount vaccines or discount Spay/Neuter during events and find other ways to make sure our neighbors are taken care of - dependent on our communities needs.

All of our animals receive quality care from our fosters, while be given the proper time and love needed to grow. Our fosters take the time to learn about our rescues to help place them in matching homes. All intakes are given their shots, flea treatment and are Spay/Neutered. Some receive additional testing like FIV/FELV. If any additional medical attention is needed, we are sure to attend to those needs. We even take the time to provide basic training for our animals when available. Aside from basic care, as you can imagine, this gets expensive! We wouldn't be where we are today without the help of our community.

It is important to note that while the safety of our animals is important, the safety of our volunteers is important as well. With this in mind, we do not take on "aggressive cases" and will meet potential new intakes before taking them in. All volunteers receive access to our Open Resource Library full of educational materials. In addition, someone is always with them on the first day of intake to properly introduce their new foster. Just as our adopters, we follow a 3-3-3 rule to make sure our fosters are doing okay. We do our best to train our volunteers with each new challenge and set them up for success in the future. Come join our team today! 

Home: About

WHY FOSTER-BASED?

Coming Back Home Rescue is completely foster based, meaning we rely on amazing members of the community to help house our rescues until they're ready to be adopted. This decision was made to help eliminate Kennel Syndrome in our animals but also to help them live healthy, enriching lives without the confined spaces of a kennel. With every dog, cat, and other types of animals in a foster - they're able to have proper one-on-one engagement with much needed time to grow, learn, and be loved.

What is Kennel Syndrome?

Kennel Syndrome is the behavior that a dog assumes in survival mode. That means bold or aggressive dogs can turn sweet and submissive in order to get the food or shelter they need to survive, as well as submissive dog may turn bold in order to gain respect or shelter. Dogs are masters of opportunity and have survived as a species thousands of years because of their adaptability. 


Can other animals aside from dogs get Kennel Syndrome?
While not often discussed, it is not known to link other types of animals to Kennel Syndrome. However, placing any animal in a loud and cramped area could cause stress to that animal. When an animal is stressed, they tend to show signs that they may be stressed or be aggressive out of fear. 


Dogs with Kennel Syndrome often resort to:

  • Cage Fighting

  • Emotional Shut Down

  • Cage Chewing

  • Food Aggression

  • Outward Signs of Aggression

  • Overall Destructive Behavior

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